Courses

Spring 2019 Courses

 

EDUC BC 1510 Educational Foundations

Introduction to the psychological, philosophical, sociological, and historical foundations of education as way to understand what education is, how education has become what it is, and to envision what education should be. Students must sign up for a discussion section (EDUC BC 1511).

Students are required to attend a discussion section (EDUC BC 1511). BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC1510

EDUC
1510

01183
001

M W 2:40 - 3:55 PM
TBA

T. Abu El-Haj

 

 

EDUC BC 3040 Migration, Globalization, and Education

Globalization and mass migration are reconfiguring the modern world and reshaping the contours of nation-states. New technologies that facilitate the movement of information, goods, and people across borders have madeit easier for people to remain culturally, politically, economically and socially connected to the places from which they migrated. This seminar focuses on the experiences of the youngest members of these global migration patterns—children and youth—and asks: What do these global flows mean for educating young people to be members of the multiple communities to which they belong?


Prerequisites: course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting​. Open to all students, preference given to Ed. Studies and Urban Studies students. Enrollment limited to 25 students. BC: Nine Ways of Knowing GER Designation: Social Analysis (SOC I). BC: Foundations GER Designation: Social Science. BC: Foundations Modes of Thinking GER Designation: Thinking through Global Inquiry.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3040

EDUC
3040

08452
001

T 2:10 - 4 PM
TBA

T. Abu El-Haj

 

 

EDUC BC 3042 Gender, Sexuality, and Schooling

Broadly, this course explores the relationship between gender, sexuality, and schooling across national contexts. We begin by considering theoretical perspectives, exploring the ways in which gender and sexuality have been studied and understood in the interdisciplinary field of education. Next, we consider the ways in which the subjective experience of gender and sexuality in schools is often overlooked or inadequately theorized. Exploring the ways that race, class, citizenship, religion and other categories of identity intersect with gender and sexuality, we give primacy to the contention that subjectivity is historically complex, and does not adhere to the analytically distinct identity categories we might try to impose on it.


Prerequisites: course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting​. Open to all students, preference given to Ed. Studies and Urban Studies students. Enrollment limited to 25 students. BC: Foundations Modes of Thinking GER Designation: Thinking about Social Difference.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3042

EDUC
3042

01186
001

Th 12:10 - 2 PM
TBA

R. Throop

 

 

EDUC BC 3050 Science in the City

In partnership with the American Museum of Natural History students investigate science, science pedagogical methods, and ways to use New York City as a resource for science teaching and learning. Sessions will be held at Barnard and the museum. Field trips and fieldwork required. Non-science majors pre-service elementary students and first year students, welcome. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. 
Priority given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies, and Urban Studies students. Open to non-science majors and first-year students.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3050

EDUC
3050

04696
001

Tu 4:30 - 6:20 PM
TBA

A. Hoard


    

 

EDUC BC 3051 Seminar in Urban Education

The Seminar in Urban Education explores the historical, political and socio-cultural dynamics of urban education in the U.S. context. Over time, a range of social actors have intervened in the “problem” of urban education, attempting to reshape and reform urban schools. Others have disputed this “problem” focused approach, arguing that policy makers, teachers, and researchers should start from the strengths and capacities located in urban communities. Despite decades of wide ranging reform efforts, however, many urban schools still fail to provide their students with an adequate, equitable education. Seminar in Urban Education investigates this paradox by pursuing three central course questions: 1) How have various social actors tried to achieve equity in urban schools over time? 2) What are the range and variation of assets and challenges found in urban schools? and 3) Considering this history and context, what would effective reform in a global city like NYC look like? Students will engage these questions not only through course readings and seminar discussions, but through a 40-hour field placement in a New York City public school classroom, extra-curricular program, or other education based site. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: Priority given to Education Studies and Urban Studies students, preference given to senior students, then to junior students. Enrollment limited to 24 students for each section. 
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2018 :: EDUC BC3051

EDUC
3051

01187
001

T 4:10p - 7:00p
TBA

R. Throop

 

 

EDUC BC 3053 Multicultural Elementary Pedagogy

Provides prospective teachers with theory and methods for teaching elementary school subjects (grades 1-6) to meet intellectual, social and emotional needs of diverse learners. Topics include foundations of multicultural, student-centered and critical pedagogies, all aspects of literacy, utilizing literacy across content areas, constructivist mathematics instruction, authentic assessment, diversity and inclusion. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: this course is a prerequisite for student teaching in elementary schools and must be taken in the spring term of the junior year before student teaching (EDUC BC 3063); Grade of B or better required to continue. Open to Education Program participants; others only with the instructor's permission.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3053

EDUC
3053

01189
001

Tu 8:40 - 11:30 AM
TBA

L. Edstrom

 

 

EDUC BC 3054 Multicultural Secondary Pedagogy

Prospective teachers explore methods for teaching English, social studies, the sciences (biology, physics, earth science and chemistry), mathematics, ancient and foreign languages (Grades 7-12). Topics include multicultural, critical pedagogical methods appropriate to specific content areas, content area standards and literacy, diversity, inclusion, and assessment. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: this course is a prerequisite for student teaching in secondary schools and must be taken in the spring term of the junior year before student teaching (EDUC BC 3065); grade of B or better required to continue. Open to Education Program students; others only with the instructor's permission.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3054

EDUC
3054

01191
001

Tu 2:10 - 5 PM
TBA

R. Throop

 


EDUC BC 3055 Arts and Humanities in the City: Critical Literacy and Digital Storytelling

Using the theme of “Arts and Humanities in the City”, this seminar will build participants’ knowledge of critical literacy, digital storytelling methods, and ways to use New York City as a resource for teaching the Arts (Dance, Theatre, Music, and Visual Arts), Social Studies, and English Language Arts in grades K-12. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Priority given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies, and Urban Studies students. Open to non-science majors and first-year students.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3055

EDUC
3055

00764
001

Th 4:10 - 7 PM
TBA

L. Rabinowitz

 


EDUC BC 3061 Performance Assessment of Teaching

3 points Open to Urban Teaching students in the Education Program.

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Spring 2019 :: EDUC BC3061

EDUC
3061

06288
001

M 2:10 - 4 PM
TBA

L. Edstrom

 

 

Fall 2019 Courses

EDUC BC 1510 Educational Foundations

Introduction to the psychological, philosophical, sociological, and historical foundations of education as way to understand what education is, how education has become what it is, and to envision what education should be. Students must sign up for a discussion section (EDUC BC 1511).

Students are required to attend a discussion section (EDUC BC 1511). BC: Fulfillment of General Education Requirement: Historical Studies (HIS).
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC1510

EDUC
1510

07891
001

Tu TH 4:10p - 5:25p
TBA

R. Throop

0/30

EDUC
1510
07910
002
M W 11:40a - 12:55p
TBA
TBA 0/30
 
 

EDUC BC 3025 Inclusive Approaches to K-12 Literacy: Theory and Practice

This seminar engages students in an exploration of how schools prepare students to be literate across multiple subject areas. Engaging students with theory and practice, we will look at how students learn to read and write. considering approaches for literacy instruction from early childhood through adolescence. Understanding that schools are required to meet the needs of diverse learners, we will explore what it means to provide culturally relevant literacy instruction for K-12 students with special needs, multilingual learners, and students from diverse cultural backgrounds. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

4 points Prerequisites: this course is a prerequisite for student teaching in elementary schools; Grade of B or better required to continue. Open to Education Program participants; others only with the instructor's permission.

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3025

EDUC
3025

07894
001

Tu 8:40 - 11:30a
TBA

L. Edstrom

0/16

 

EDUC BC 3044 Education and Social Change in Comparative Global Contexts

This course will examine the relationship between education and social change in different regions of the world, with a focus on vulnerable populations (e.g., indigenous groups, street and working children, immigrants, women and girls, refugees). In particular, we will explore the questions: What is the role of education in democratization and transitions to democracy? How is education implicated in relations of social and economic inequality? Education is commonly assumed to be a vehicle for social transformation and democratization, but in many countries where education has expanded, poverty and social inequality persist. How does education reproduce inequalities of race, class, gender, and language in different societies, and how might it challenge these inequalities? Where do we glimpse the transformative potential of education? Viewing education in its broadest sense (both formal and informal), we will examine the ways that education has been used by different states to achieve national political ends—to “promote democracy” and/or to produce particular kinds of citizens—and the ways it has been used by popular and grassroots organizations to empower groups that have been neglected by the State.

Prerequisites: course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting; Google Form application will be sent via e-mail. Open to all students, preference given to Urban Teaching, Ed. Studies, and Urban Studies students. Enrollment limited to 16 students for each section.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3044

EDUC
3044

07907
001

Tu 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA

T. Abu El-Haj

0/16

 

EDUC BC 3045 Complicating Class: Education and the Limits of Equity

Social class matters. As income inequalities widen within and between nations, and as discourse focused on class and inequality is returning to public debates across the globe, the moment is ripe for productive dialogue on the topic of class. But…talking about class is hard. Folks often lack the language, and even when they do try to tackle the topic, they may have misconceptions about what class is and how class matters in our daily lives. Further, in class conversations, education and schooling are invariably invoked as the solution – or at least a useful weapon – in the fight against inequality. And yet, in the American context, a federally commissioned study in the 1960s found that family socioeconomic status was the strongest influence on a child’s educational achievement and life chances; almost six decades later, numerous studies have demonstrated that these findings still hold. In other words, while we would like to believe educational achievement determines social class (and allows for social mobility), in fact, research shows that social class determines educational outcomes. Despite this, the cherished American belief in the possibility of social mobility through schooling persists. This belief extends beyond the U.S.; while the contours of the conversation may vary, education is positioned as the solution to rising inequality across a range of national contexts. Time and time again, we see a shared belief in schooling and social mobility neutralize the politics of class difference.

In this course, we start from the premise that a failure to understand what social class is and how social class matters in daily life stops us from having conversations about the possibilities and limitations of schooling and, as such, prevents us from doing what we can to improve the schooling experiences of poor and working-class students. Explicitly, we will debunk four common assumptions that stop us from having cogent conversations about the work class does in schools: 

  1. Class is a static category that we can mark by income level, educational level, or some other variable that can be pinned down and measured. 

  2. We can/should segment and compare the poor, working class, middle class, and elite. 

  3. Social mobility is inherently good. 

  4. Schools should be the starting point in the fight against social inequality. 

In other words, throughout this semester, we will work to “complicate class”, reconsidering what class is, why class matters, and how we can best think about the relationship between social class and schooling. You will develop a language for talking about class, considering the affordances and constraints of various conceptions of class. You will also leave with critical questions about the possibilities and limitations of relying on schools as a solution to social problems. Recognizing restraints, we will conclude by reflecting on how we might work toward creating more equitable learning environments for poor and working-class students. 


Prerequisites: course enrollment will be determined after the first class meeting. Open to all students, preference given to Urban Teaching, Ed. Studies, and Urban Studies students. Enrollment limited to 16 students for each section.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3045

EDUC
3045

07908
001

Th 12:10p - 2:00p
TBA

R. Throop

0/16

 

EDUC BC 3051 Seminar in Urban Education

The Seminar in Urban Education explores the historical, political and socio-cultural dynamics of urban education in the U.S. context. Over time, a range of social actors have intervened in the “problem” of urban education, attempting to reshape and reform urban schools. Others have disputed this “problem” focused approach, arguing that policy makers, teachers, and researchers should start from the strengths and capacities located in urban communities. Despite decades of wide ranging reform efforts, however, many urban schools still fail to provide their students with an adequate, equitable education. Seminar in Urban Education investigates this paradox by pursuing three central course questions: 1) How have various social actors tried to achieve equity in urban schools over time? 2) What are the range and variation of assets and challenges found in urban schools? and 3) Considering this history and context, what would effective reform in a global city like NYC look like? Students will engage these questions not only through course readings and seminar discussions, but through a 40-hour field placement in a New York City public school classroom, extra-curricular program, or other education based site. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: Priority given to Education Studies and Urban Studies students, preference given to senior students, then to junior students. Enrollment limited to 16 students for each section. 
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3051

EDUC
3051

07893
001

M 2:10p - 5:00p
TBA

TBA

0/16

 

EDUC BC 3055 Arts and Humanities in the City: Critical Literacy and Digital Storytelling

Using the theme of “Arts and Humanities in the City”, this seminar will build participants’ knowledge of critical literacy, digital storytelling methods, and ways to use New York City as a resource for teaching the Arts (Dance, Theatre, Music, and Visual Arts), Social Studies, and English Language Arts in grades K-12. Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. Priority given to Urban Teaching, Education Studies, and Urban Studies students. Open to non-science majors and first-year students.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3055

EDUC
3055

07909
001

M 4:10p - 7:00p
TBA

TBA

0/16

 
 

EDUC BC 3063 Elementary Student Teaching in Urban Schools

Supervised student teaching in elementary schools includes creating lesson plans, involving students in active learning, using cooperative methods, developmentally appropriate assessment, and meeting the needs of diverse learners in urban schools. Teaching skills developed through weekly individual and/or group supervision meetings (to be scheduled at the beginning of the semester), conferences, and portfolio design. Requires 100 hours of teaching at two different grade levels, full-time for one semester. Note: Students are only permitted to leave their student teaching placements early twice a week, once for EDUC BC3064 and one other day for one additional course having a start time of 2 pm or later. Students are only permitted to take one additional course while enrolled in EDUC BC3063 and EDUC BC3064Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: completion of EDUC BC3053 and EDUC BC3025, with grades of B or better. NYCDOE Fingerprinting. Corequisites: EDUC BC3064. Enrollment limited.
6 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3063

EDUC
3063

07896
001

W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA

L. Edstrom

0/5

 

EDUC BC 3064 Critical Inquiry in Urban Teaching

Designed to help student teachers develop as reflective practictioners who can think critically about issues facing urban schools, particularly how race, class and gender influence schooling; and to examine the challenges and possibilities for providing intellectually engaging, meaningful curriculum to all students in urban classrooms.

Corequisites: EDUC BC3063 or EDUC BC3065. Enrollment limited to student teachers enrolled in the Education Program.
4 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3064

EDUC
3064

07890
001

W 4:10p - 6:30p
TBA

T. Abu El-Haj

0/10

 

EDUC BC 3065 Secondary Student Teaching in Urban Schools

Supervised student teaching in secondary schools includes creating lesson plans, involving students in active learning, using cooperative methods, developmentally appropriate assessment, and meeting the needs of diverse learners in urban schools. Teaching skills developed through weekly individual and/or group supervision meetings (to be scheduled at the beginning of the semester), conferences, and portfolio design. Requires 100 hours of teaching at two different grade levels, full-time for one semester. Note: Students are only permitted to leave their student teaching placements early twice a week, once for EDUC BC3064 and one other day for one additional course having a start time of 2 pm or later. Students are only permitted to take one additional course while enrolled in EDUC BC3064 and EDUC BC3065Fingerprinting required. Please refer to our Fingerprinting page for more information.

Prerequisites: completion of EDUC BC3054 and EDUC BC3025, with grades of B or better. NYCDOE Fingerprinting required. Corequisites: EDUC BC3064. Enrollment limited.
6 points

COURSE
NUMBER

CALL NUMBER/
SECTION

DAYS & TIMES/
LOCATION

INSTRUCTOR

ENROLLMENT

Fall 2019 :: EDUC BC3065

EDUC
3065

07897
001

W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA

TBA

0/5

 


Cross-Listed Courses

American Studies (Barnard)

BC3300 Topics in American Studies: The Wealth of Natives

Economics (Barnard)

BC3012 Economics of Education

Sociology (Barnard)
UN3225 Sociology of Education